Dengue fever is spread by mosquitos

D-MOSS scoops British Expertise International award

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Our space-based D-MOSS system was the winner in the ‘international development – non-physical project’ category at prestigious British Expertise International Awards yesterday. The pioneering D-MOSS system forecasts dengue fever outbreaks up to six months in advance, allowing authorities to allocate the costly resources needed to control the disease. 

The flagship project, funded by the UK Space Agency, could eventually help around half the world’s population who are at risk from dengue fever, as well as being used for other vector-borne diseases like malaria and zika. D-MOSS is now live in Vietnam and is being rolled out to six other Asian countries.

Bruce Tomlinson, CEO of HR Wallingford said: “We are thrilled that our D-MOSS system has been recognised in the British Expertise Awards. It is a testament to the huge potential of the system for managing mosquito-borne diseases, as well as the hard work and dedication of the whole D-MOSS team.

HR Wallingford leads the D-MOSS consortium, working alongside the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the UK Met Office and Oxford Policy Management in the UK, and with the following international partners: the United Nations Development Programme, the World Health Organisation, the Vietnamese Institute of Meteorology, Hydrology and Climate Change, the Pasteur Institute Ho Chi Minh City, the National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology in Vietnam and the International Medical University in Malaysia, Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology Tay Nguyen (Vietnam), Pasteur Institute Nha Trang (Vietnam), Ministry of Health (Vietnam), Institute for Medical Research (Malaysia). The project is sponsored by the UK Space Agency’s International Partnership Programme (IPP), a five-year, £152 million programme designed to partner UK space expertise with overseas governments and organisations to deliver sustainable, economic or societal benefits.